Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

29069989Title: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany, & Jack Thorne | Goodreads
Release Date: July 31, 2016
Publisher: Arthur A. Levine Books
Format: Hardcover
Source: Bought
Rating: 5 stars

It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband, and father of three school-age children.

While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes darkness comes from unexpected places.

A-M-A-Z-I-N-G.

The summary is all you need to know going into the story. Yes, there were some typos. Yes, there was a strange use of punctuation (which I attribute to The Cursed Child being a script rather than a novel).

But this book was freaking intense and wonderful. I LOVE Scorpius Malfoy. And I love that Harry and Draco worked together for their sons. Draco has obviously matured and endured more hardships in the nineteen years since his time at Hogwarts; I appreciated getting to understand his character better. And it’s so cool that Harry and Draco’s sons—the sons of arch nemeses—are best friends. The friendships in this story, both new and old, are amazing. The Cursed Child is a wonderful mix of past, beloved Harry Potter characters and new characters (or characters from the Deathly Hallows epilogue). I also learned through this book that I really hate time travel in the wizarding world. It is a total mind f**k.

Do not hesitate to devour this book. It is worth the hefty price tag, though you can get it for 40% off online here and here.

What did you think of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child?
Let me know in a comment below!

Thanks for reading.

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This Is How You Lose Her by Junot Díaz

13503109-1Novel: This Is How You Lose Her by Junot Díaz | Goodreads
Release Date: September 11, 2012
Publisher: Riverhead Books
Format: Paperback
Source: Borrowed
Rating: 4 stars

On a beach in the Dominican Republic, a doomed relationship flounders. In the heat of a hospital laundry room in New Jersey, a woman does her lover’s washing and thinks about his wife. In Boston, a man buys his love child, his only son, a first baseball bat and glove. At the heart of these stories is the irrepressible, irresistible Yunior, a young hardhead whose longing for love is equaled only by his recklessness–and by the extraordinary women he loves and loses: artistic Alma; the aging Miss Lora; Magdalena, who thinks all Dominican men are cheaters; and the love of his life, whose heartbreak ultimately becomes his own.

In prose that is endlessly energetic, inventive, tender, and funny, the stories in This Is How You Lose Her lay bare the infinite longing and inevitable weakness of the human heart. They remind us that passion always triumphs over experience, and that “the half-life of love is forever.”

This Is How You Lose Her is a collection of short stories following characters from the Dominican Republic who have immigrated to the United States. The stories are centered around relationships, love, family, and the idea of being with someone and what that means. The collection is full of manipulation, both by males and females, strife, stereotypes, and foul language. I found it eye-opening.

The first story was by far my favorite. It chronicles the fall of Yunior and Magdalena’s relationship and I thought it was well constructed and well done. Díaz managed to portray the situation in such a realistic way that really reached out to me as a reader. The last story, “A Cheater’s Guide to Love”, was probably my second favorite and also the longest. Most of the stories follow or contain Yunior, but others branch off to follow different characters, all of whom are experiencing the hardships living in America brings and forming connections—both good and bad—with other Dominicans.

Overall, I really enjoyed This Is How You Lose Her. It sparked my interest in Junot Díaz’s other books and gave me new perspective on a facet of hispanic (mainly Dominican) culture and society, especially within the United States. The collection of stories is not beautiful in a happy way; it’s actually kind of a downer filled with tragedy, repeated mistakes, misery, and heartbreak. While some of the stories were dull, I thought the entire collection as a whole was cohesive and illustrious, and I recommend giving it a shot if the premise interests you. I’m glad I did.

Thanks for reading.

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The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

Yoon_9780553496680_jkt_all_r1.inddNovel: The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon | Goodreads
Release Date: November 1, 2016
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Format: ARC
Source: B-Fest
Rating: 4.5 stars

Natasha: I’m a girl who believes in science and facts. Not fate. Not destiny. Or dreams that will never come true. I’m definitely not the kind of girl who meets a cute boy on a crowded New York City street and falls in love with him. Not when my family is twelve hours away from being deported to Jamaica. Falling in love with him won’t be my story.

Daniel: I’ve always been the good son, the good student, living up to my parents’ high expectations. Never the poet. Or the dreamer. But when I see her, I forget about all that. Something about Natasha makes me think that fate has something much more extraordinary in store—for both of us.

The Universe: Every moment in our lives has brought us to this single moment. A million futures lie before us. Which one will come true?

The Sun Is Also a Star is the story of a girl and boy from different backgrounds meeting and falling in love. It’s also about family, cultural identities and assimilation, and the challenges of immigration in the United States. The novel is set in New York City and takes place over the course of a single day. Despite it being a young adult contemporary novel, which is a genre I generally avoid, I found The Sun Is Also a Star to be brilliantly composed, well-researched, thought-provoking, and fun.

Let’s start with the basics.

Natasha is a seventeen-year-old undocumented immigrant living in NYC. She moved to the U.S. with her mother at the age of eight to join her father, who’d been trying to make it as a Broadway actor for several years. She’s smart, cynical, and hardworking—a no nonsense kind of girl who knows what she wants and how to get it. She doesn’t believe in love, fate, destiny, religion, or even dreams; she believes in science, and science alone.

Natasha’s world is falling apart. Her dad is living in la-la land within his own mind—he’s failing as an actor and has pretty much given up on work and the world. He’s resentful of his family and feels he gave up his dream career, his “God-given talent” of acting, for his wife and two kids. One night, he gets a D.U.I., revealing to a police officer the illegal immigration status of his family. The Kingsley family is thus issued a deportation order, which ruins all of Natasha’s plans for the rest of her senior year of high school, college, and a career. The day that her family is supposed to leave the United States—presumably forever—Natasha sets out into the city to find someone, anyone, who can help her get the deportation order reversed. Why should her life be wrecked because her father made a stupid mistake?

Enter Daniel. Daniel was born in America and is the youngest son of Korean immigrants. His older brother Charlie’s suspension from Harvard leads his parents to exert more pressure on Daniel to attend Yale and become a doctor. Daniel’s parents know what it’s like to be poor, and the thought of their sons living in poverty someday haunts them. They think they know what’s best for Daniel and refuse him any room to design his own life and career.

Daniel is a dreamer. He’s honest, self-deprecating, passionate, and funny, and he aspires to be a poet. Daniel believes in God, in fate, and in “meant to be.” Most of all, though, he believes in love. When Daniel and Natasha cross paths, is it purely due to coincidence, or has a string of events caused by fate led them together? Upon first look, they’re polar opposites of each other, but as the day goes on, they discover they have more and more in common: dysfunctional families, problems with their parents, and an undeniable connection with each other. Whether it’s simply chemicals in their brains, as Natasha believes, or a grand destiny, as Daniel thinks, the 12 hour love story of Natasha and Daniel is fascinating, funny, and heartwarming. I found that it was easy to put aside the little voice in my head that likes to chant “unrealistic” at me while reading YA contemporary novels and go with the flow of Nicola Yoon’s story. The relationships, cultures, science, and politics involved make it different from any other novel I’ve read, and I appreciate the personal touches and amount of research Yoon put into her story. The format of The Sun Is Also a Star, which consists of chapters that alternate by POV, sprinkled tidbits of outside perspectives, and short chapters on topics such as love, irie, and scientific theories/studies, was delightful and interesting to read.

I thoroughly enjoyed Nicola Yoon’s sophomore novel, The Sun Is Also a Star, and I recommend it to the non-believers and those who enjoy a bit of whimsicality in their contemporary reading. It hits shelves November 1st, so be sure to grab yourself a copy!

Thanks for reading.

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Mini Reviews | 1

 

I’ve slacked a bit over the last two months in writing full reviews (and wrap-ups) of the books I’ve read. Rather than break my pledge to review every book I read this year, I figured I’d compromise and write mini reviews of the books I read in April and May, complete with my general thoughts on each. This post will be the first of two. Enjoy!

Hamlet by William Shakespeare | Goodreads (3/5 stars)1589254My AP English class read Hamlet aloud this spring. I have to say, it isn’t one of my favorite Shakespeare plays. I’m unsure whether that’s because I didn’t like the content or because I disliked the manner in which we read it. I believe it’s more of the latter, because I found it hard to understand and don’t think I got as much out of the unit as I could have. Regardless, Hamlet is an exciting, yet frustrating, tale of murder, familial relations, court politics, conquest, and, most importantly, revenge.

Untitled-14The Slow Regard of Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss | Goodreads (2.5/5 stars)
This was a weird one. Patrick Rothfuss admitted it would be in an open letter at the beginning of the book. The novella is set in the world of The Kingkiller Chronicle series and follows Auri over the course of seven days as she awaits Kvothe’s return (from where, we don’t know). Auri completes all sorts of odd tasks around the Underthing and readers get a glimpse into her fragile and childlike mind. I personally didn’t much enjoy this book and skimmed through quite a bit of it. There’s not really a plot, per say; rather, the story winds aimlessly as Auri does whatever it is that Auri does. I thought the writing was beautiful, but The Slow Regard of Silent Things was a snooze for me.

20443235The Winner’s Kiss by Marie Rutkoski | Goodreads (4.5/5 stars)
The Winner’s Kiss is the third and final installment in The Winner’s Trilogy. In it, we follow Kestrel and Arin’s separate struggles as they face war and imprisonment, then rejoice as they reunite to kick some emperor butt. I won’t say more on the plot because I don’t want to spoil the series for those who haven’t read it, but I found The Winner’s Kiss to be a very satisfying conclusion to the trilogy. I liked the first two books a bit more (I gave them both 5 stars, I believe) and found this installment to be a little less intense, but perhaps that’s because I read reviews beforehand and knew that everything would end well. Nevertheless, I really enjoyed watching Kestrel and Arin grow individually as well as together and I wish them a happily ever after.

Thanks for reading.

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February Reading List

Helloooo. Today I’m sharing my February reading list, or February “to be read” (TBR) list. In the past, I’ve had a bad tendency of not sticking to my TBR lists because I get book cravings and mood-read and my interests change often throughout the month. But it’s a new year and I’m trying the monthly TBR list out once more. I did pretty well with sticking to my TBR last month, so here’s what I’m hoping to read in February.

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A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin | Goodreads
This is one of my top 10 books to read in 2016. I started it in January and want to finish it this month!

11788811A Clash of Kings by George R.R. Martin | Goodreads
My goal this month is to START the second installment of the A Song of Ice and Fire series. These books are long and complex, so reading them is time-consuming. But I will persevere! Slow and steady wins the race, and I’m pacing myself with this series like it’s a marathon.

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Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie | Goodreads
Peter Pan is one of my favorite childhood stories. I’ve read and watched many adaptations, but have never read the original story! I think after the exhaustion of reading A Game of Thrones, a light children’s book will be just what I need.

10194157Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo | Goodreads
Last month, I read Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo and LOVED IT. It is one of my all-time favorite books, and will definitely make my bests list this year. While you definitely don’t need to read the Grisha trilogy to understand and enjoy Six of Crows, I’m interested to learn more about the Grisha world. Hopefully I’ll get to Shadow and Bone this month!

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Truthwitch by Susan Dennard | Goodreads
Unlike most of the book blogging/vlogging community, I’m not screaming mad to read this novel. The main reason I’m interested in Truthwitch is that Sarah J. Maas blurbed it and gave it a raving review, which is to be expected given that Maas and Dennard are best friends. I think I’ve remained pretty immune to the hype, so I’m going into this novel with few expectations; I’m just hoping to enjoy it.

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The Heart of Betrayal by Mary E. Pearson | Goodreads
The Kiss of Deception was one of my favorite books of 2015, and it’s taken me way too long to get to its sequel. The Remnant Chronicles is a fast-paced fantasy series filled with plot twists, royalty, assassins, and magic. I’m hoping to see more world-building in the second book and I can’t wait to see what twists Pearson has in store for these characters!

Well there you have it! Those are the six books I’m hoping to read in February.
What are you planning to read this month? I’d love to know! 

Thanks for reading.

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